Newport Mansions

American History & the Mansions of Newport
Some of the mansions in Newport have been standing since before the Revolutionary War. Because of this, not only are they testaments to American architecture, they’re beacons of history, harboring our national identity within their ornately adorned walls.

Rough Point
Rough Point was the Newport home of Doris Duke—heiress, philanthropist and art collector. Enjoy her magnificent oceanfront estate, still decorated as she left it, where you will see French furniture, European art, Chinese porcelains, and Turkish carpets collected from exotic locations around the world. Located on Newport’s exclusive Bellevue Avenue, Rough Point provides a sweeping ocean view and expansive grounds designed by renowned landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted.
 
The Breakers
Considered a summer “cottage” by the Vanderbilt family when it was built in the late 1800s, The Breakers is one of the grandest mansions in Newport, with 70 Renaissance-style rooms full of priceless art. Today, it’s a National Historic Landmark.

The Elms
Modeled after a famous French chateau, The Elms was completed in 1901. The mansion is full of Renaissance ceramics, Oriental jades, and 18th century paintings. Perhaps most impressive are its gardens, full of sculptures, exotic plants, marble pavilions, and fountains.

Marble House
Built between 1888-1892 for the Vanderbilts, Marble House is another of their “cottages.” Consisting of 500,000 cubic-feet of marble, the home was a gift to Mrs. Vanderbilt for her 39th birthday, and marked the turn toward “stone palaces” in Newport.

Rosecliff

Inspired by Versailles, Rosecliff was commissioned by Nevada silver heiress, Theresa Fair Oelrichs in 1899. It was the site of some of Newport’s most opulent parties, and has since appeared in many films, including The Great Gatsby and Amistad.

Area Activities

1 Goat Island, Newport, Rhode Island, USA, 02840

  • Tel: +1 401 851 1234
  • Fax: +1 401 846 7210